Split LP of modular synth explorations with Matt Carlson guiding you through dangerous overgrown jungles and Jason E Anderson maxing out your brain's auditory perception circuits.


DISSOCIATIVE SYNTHESIS
MATT CARLSON / JASON E ANDERSON

12" LP SPLIT, SWEDISH IMPORT
MASTERED & CUT BY RASHAD BECKER AT D&M
RELEASED FEBRUARY 27, 2012
UFO MONGO 024 (BÖRFT)
PURCHASE HERE:

*ALSO AVAILABLE AT WWW.BORFT.COM (EU) OR WWW.BUCKETFACTORY.COM (US) & COMING SOON TO US DISTRIBUTORS

AUDIO SAMPLES:
SIDE A CARLSON Mycelium
SIDE B ANDERSON Arthritides

MATT CARLSON AND JASON E ANDERSON DISCUSS THEIR NEW RECORD ENTITLED DISSOCIATIVE SYNTHESIS. EACH HAVE ASKED THREE QUESTIONS: ONE ABOUT THE OTHER'S CONTRIBUTION, ONE ABOUT THEIR OWN, AND ONE THEY ANSWER THEMSELVES. THIS IS AN EFFORT TO EXPLORE A CREATIVE ALTERNATIVE TO STANDARD PROMOTION, BUT THE MESSAGE IS THE SAME: WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO PURCHASE THIS RECORD.

CARLSON: Your piece has an almost hallucinogenic quality to me, as if my ears can't possibly be hearing what they're actually hearing and therefore must be making shit up. Was this a quality you were intentionally trying to cultivate, a sort of 'aural impossible object', or were you thinking of other things?

ANDERSON: In a sense, yes, this was what I was going for... I wanted to explore the idea of using psycho-acoustical properties of sound within the confines of my synthesizer to manipulate the listener's perception of where the music existed in space. I was trying to make a music that inverted space, through the use of timbre shifts, phase relationships and pseudo-random/random operations. Conceptually, my thought was that by bombarding the listener with sound, and designing the sound so that it seems to exist within the head/between the ears, the user unconsciously disengages during sensory confusion, losing touch with their built in sense of time. Time machine or a hallucinogen?

CARLSON: You mentioned before an "East Coast/West Coast" or "Subtractive/Additive Synthesis" divide between our two sides. Could you expand a bit on how you see my piece fitting into these categories?

ANDERSON: To clarify to those that are unfamiliar with those classifications, my understanding of "East Coast/West Coast" is that they are somewhat general terms that primarily describe two different synthesis methods, Subtractive/Additive respectively, associated with the geographic areas of the US each were developed and/or put to practice in. (I hesitate to encourage this sort of terminology since both methods are useful techniques and there is no reason to limit oneself to one way of doing things.) Your piece uses primarily subtractive synthesis methods, shaping the harmonic content of sounds through the use of various filtering techniques. It has more of an old school Moog flavor - your sounds are thick and resonant (that last pulse hits HARD) and they have a natural, physical feel about them. In that respect, they seem to fall under the so-called "East Coast" school of synthesis. This differs in respect to my piece, where the sounds I'm using are primary based on additive processes - the sounds are maybe a bit more harsh, abstract and the piece as a whole is conceivably less "listenable"!

CARLSON: What is different about this piece from other recent work?

CARLSON: Well, the main challenge to myself was to try and make something that was full of complexity without using any outboard effects and to mostly record it live. This gives it a more stripped-down, dry quality than recent music I've done. Also maybe a more improvisational feel as there's a lot of audible patching/knob tweaking. In general it sounds more like me just playing the synth than like a through-composed piece.

ANDERSON: One of the first things I heard in your tracks was this sense of detachment, yet all three retain this highly-personalized, bugged-out sensibility I have grown accustomed to in your work. My initial thought was this might have something to do with your interest in science and metaphysics. Can you comment on how you view your piece on a conceptual level?

CARLSON: I think science and the scientific worldview plays some inspiring role in everything I do, but it comes out differently in different projects. For this piece I was thinking about biology and life as a system that creates infinite diversity. This became kind of a metaphor in my mind for the modular synth, which is itself a confined system capable of great diversity. Then I began thinking of myself in the same way, that I as a human being am a kind of system that simultaneously falls into predictable patterns yet is idiosyncratic and impossible to predict with exact certainty. So then a given patch on the synthesizer, combined with me and the particular way I play the keyboard and physically interact with the instrument, together formed an organism analogous to a living organism in all it's fleeting specificity and particularity. And the piece is like a collection of three of these organisms, as if you're looking at specimens in a natural history museum.

ANDERSON: This is my first work in about 5+ years that I've recorded under my own name. You're fairly familiar with my work, can you describe the ways in which my tracks are different from the things I've been doing over that past couple years?

CARLSON: Well, I feel like I know you first and foremost as an improviser, and although the sounds that make up your composition may have been arrived at through a process of improvisation, the logic of the piece itself seems to have little in common with that of an improvisation. It feels quite rigorously arranged, the result of a long and meticulous process of trying out many different possibilities until you arrived at exactly what you wanted. Also, I believe this is your first piece in some time where you've taken advantage of the possibilities of digital multitracking and editing, no? And your exploration of psycho-acoustics seems like a new development for you as well. Overall, the piece feels much bigger, denser, faster, and more insane than what I've been hearing from you over the last couple years.

ANDERSON: Why the title Dissociative Synthesis?

ANDERSON: The shared title for our record came about in an effort to unify our respective sides into a cohesive overall concept. This was a very easy process because we both sort of synchronistically came up with these heady pieces that seemed to imply this idea of 'separating from the self'. I think that is what makes this record unique, this kind of fragmented personality or clinical detachment expressed in both sides, approached in completely different ways, but created on pretty much the exact same synthesizer.